10 great health and science books from 2017

I love end of the year book lists. I always compile the ones I come across to make a consensus “reading list” and then try to get through them in the first month of the next year (it never works. Ever).

But this year, I’ve stumbled across another great book list: 10 great health and science books from 2017 (read the whole article here):

Admissions: Life as a Brain Surgeon
By Henry Marsh

The Cell: Discovering the Microscopic World that Determines Our Health, Our Consciousness, and Our Future
By Joshua Z. Rappoport

In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope
By Rana Awdish

The Longevity Economy: Unlocking the World’s Fastest-Growing, Most Misunderstood Market
By Joseph F. Coughlin

Patent Politics: Life Forms, Markets, and the Public Interest in the United States and Europe
By Shobita Parthasarathy

The Family Imprint: A Daughter’s Portrait of Love and Loss
By Nancy Borowick

Drug Wars: How Big Pharma Raises Prices and Keeps Generics off the Market
By Robin Feldman and Evan Frondorf

Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats
By Maryn McKenna

The Bright Hour: A Memoir of Living and Dying
By Nina Riggs

The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister’s Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine
By Lindsey Fitzharris

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How Do You Keep an Elephant Warm? Knit a Giant Blanket

Today, in articles that make you go “d-awwwwwww”

Unseasonably cold  weather hit the Winga Baw camp for orphaned elephants in Myanmar, and workers scrambled to protect the seven animals in their care, using straw to keep them warm, according to Sangdeaun Lek Chailert, founder of the Save Elephant Foundation, a nonprofit based in Thailand that is dedicated to Asian elephants.

Temperatures fell to 8 degrees Celsius (46 degrees Fahrenheit) in some parts of the country. But the camp, in the Bago Region of Myanmar, had another secret weapon: giant knitted and crocheted blankets.

They were donated by Blankets for Baby Rhinos, a wildlife conservation craft group founded in November 2016 on Facebook by Sue Brown, who has been involved in rhino conservation for 25 years, and Elisa Best, a veterinary surgeon.

Want to know more? Read about it here!

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E.P.A. Officials, Disheartened by Agency’s Direction, Are Leaving in Droves

I think the biggest impact of the Trump administrations attack on science, is that scientists don’t feel welcome anymore.

Which will have PROFOUND effects on our economic growth and how we are perceived as a world leader. PROFOUND.

And one common misconception I hear is that scientists think/support an idea because they are being paid to. Spoiler alert: scientist don’t get paid much in the best of times. Federal scientist almost never get paid enough. Ever.

So it’s disheartening to hear that those who are working tirelessly as civil servants are leaving the agencies in droves. Read about it here.

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Sundays at the Altar of Science

I hate the title of this article. I really do. Science is not a religion, as it does not necessitate a leap of faith, and is based in empirical evidence.

But, it is an interesting article over at the New York times about how they found science and how that changed their views on the world.

Worth reading here!

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Shelf Life: 33 Million Things

@GrrlScientist wrote an excellent article over at Medium (written for the Guardian).

“Natural history museums are many things but they are not the exclusive domain of dry, dusty old white men, rooting around in dry, dusty old drawers, examining dry, dusty old dead things. In fact, most natural history museums are modern research institutions filled with a vast diversity of items and people whose lives revolve around them. They are collections of almost anything you can name or imagine, from centuries-old specimens to more recently collected frozen tissues and digitised genomic data. These collections are essential catalogues to the sciences of taxonomy, phylogeny and biogeography, disciplines that provide a firm footing for evolution, natural history, ecology, behaviour, conservation and anthropology as well as insights into more recent processes like human-created climate change.”

Want more? Read about it here!

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