You smell like bacteria… and that’s a good thing

Birds have a number of loud and showy ways to attach a mate. But they also have a subtle one: smell.

And it turns out that some of that smell are naturally made by bacteria in the preening gland.

So I’m not saying you should use “hey girl, you smell like the best bacteria” as a pick up line, but it might be worth trying!

(If you’re a bird. NiB is not responsible for this interaction going south)

Read all about the work by Danielle Whittaker over at Science News!

"Hey girl, you smell like the sexiest microbes"

“Hey girl, you smell like the sexiest microbes”

 

The elusive tree of life

In the Origin of Species, Darwin described a “great Tree of Life” which is “fills with its dead and broken branches the crust of the earth, and covers the surface with its ever branching and beautiful ramifications.”

Ever since then biologist have been trying to describe such a tree. And it should surprise no one that the recent focus on microbial ecology has expanded the Tree considerably.

Read about it at the New York Times or in the paper over at Nature Microbiology .

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Hug et al. 2016

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Darwin’s tree, in concept and in the only figure published in his Origin of Species.

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Gut Microbes are Important for Cancer Treatment

We have written so much about the rapidly expanding study of human microbiomes, I don’t think I need to point them all out (but if you want to check them out, try here, here, here, here and here).

Well, it turns out understanding the human microbiome is important for one more thing. Fighting cancer.

Two independent research teams have demonstrated that gut microbes can dramatically alter the immune system’s ability to deal with cancer (in mice). This includes 1) an individual’s natural immunity to cancer and 2) how well they respond to immunotherapy cancer drugs.

Read about it over at the Atlantic!

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Yet another example of how microbiology is important

When people say they have gut feelings, they usually mean that they are going on instinct.

However, it turns out that your instinct, or behavior, could actually be coming from your gut. Microbes that is.

 

Over at Scientific American, an excellent article summarizes a study by Rebecca Knickmeyer on just that.

She followed a group of developing infants to determine if their guts really are altering their behavior.

Check it out!

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(almost as cool as Microbes on Mars)

 

Riding a Bike for Antibiotic Resistance Awareness

In 6 months, my friend Wesley Loftie-Eaton will cycle from Nairobi (Kenya) to Cape Town (South Africa). This epic trip is not only for the sake of adventure, but to raise awareness on antibiotic resistance and promote research in Africa. The first three blogs are already up and they are titled “Why cycling?“, “Why Antibiotic Action?” and “Why science in Africa?”.
A successful mission depends on promotion, so like, share, donate, subscribe, etc., to help Wesley in this important campaign.

His blog is here, go check it out!

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