The impact of the border wall on wildlife

Sadly, the people who want the border wall, likely will not care that it will drastically impact wildlife along the border.

But over at Vox, an excellent piece by Eliza Barclay and Sarah Frostenson lays out an amazing argument (and demonstrates visually) how this will impact biodiversity along the border.

Sadly, as this wall becomes a reality (if it becomes a reality) this is not the first or the last time we’ll be having this discussion.

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The most important (transitional) fossil you’ve never heard of

I LOVE ME SOME TRANSITIONAL FOSSILS!

But this one is particularly interesting, as it fills a crucial hole in the fossil record and demonstrates how four-limbed creatures became established on land. Found on the Scottish border, it’s called (wait for it…) Tiny.

Read about it here! _95576018_fa89156d-5853-4015-88e4-1e18fea86279.jpg

 

Nature Supports the March for Sciece

The journal, Nature, has come out in support of the march for science.

While the journal recognizes there are some strong arguments against marching, being a scientist who stand up and speak up globally for research have a chance to make a greater one.

Read about it here.

And read about the march/consider marching/support your local march/donate/call your representatives for SCIENCE.

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The Genetic Oddity that gives Cephalopods their Smarts (All Hail Cthulhu!)

It’s no secret on this blog that I’m fascinated by the intelligence, and recent increase in population size of cephalopods (and by extension their potential to take over our world…).

Octopuses can open jars, squid communicate with their own Morse code and cuttlefish start learning to identify prey when they’re just embryos.

And it turns out that their intellect might be related to the way that they edit their genes. Read about it here.

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Caves made from Giant Sloths

Local geologists in South America were investigating a series of caves that didn’t look anything like caves they had seen before. They didn’t look natural.
Well it turns out that they may be made by the long extinct giant sloths that used to roam the landscape. Or other megafauna that have long since gone extinct. Captivated? Read about it here. 
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The explanation and importance of N50 (or lack there of)

It’s pretty hard to quantify how “good” a genome or transcriptome assembly is. How do you tell you got it right? How complete is it?

One way to determine if it’s a good is N50, which is kind of a confusing concept. It’s not quite the mean, or the median length, but it is well explained in a new post over at the Molecular Ecologist!

And they promise that the importance/misinterpretation of this well used standard for genome/transcriptome assembly will be explained in future posts.

I’m looking forward to the rest of the series!

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As a peer-reviewer are you gatekeeping or editing?

In academia, sometimes you need to be a gatekeeper, sometimes you need to be an editor. But knowing when to play either role is important, and can really make a difference to the student/young scientist/person whose work you are editing.

In their ongoing discussion of the role of peer review, Dynamic Ecology has an excellent blog post addressing this distinction.

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