Atheism has a jerk problem, and so Science has an atheism problem

In a really interesting post over at small pond science, Terry McGlynn talks about the problem facing scientists of faith.

“Our scientific communities do not fully accept scientists of faith. As I’ve said before, this is a problem, and it actively hinders our efforts for equity and inclusion.

You can be a great scientist and still be religious. You can fully accept an empirical worldview for the laws and theories that govern life and matter as we know it, but also be part of a religious tradition.”

He then goes on to note that the most visible New Atheists (Bill Maher, Jerry Coyne, Michael Shermer) are loudmouth arrogant jerks. It’s how they win people over to their argument! But, by them being the face of atheism, and also associated with science, we all look like loudmouth arrogant jerks.

I’m not sure where I fall on this argument. I agree that science and faith really don’t have anything to do with one another. And I’m passionate about science communication and think that loudmouth jerks are not good ambassadors of science. But I’m not sure how to fix it, or whether or not it even needs fixing.

Read the whole blog post here, and let me know what you think!

 

 

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Darwin Turns 209 Next Week. And Here’s the Perfect Playlist to Help Us All Celebrate.

February 12th is Charles Darwin’s birthday; this year he turns 209.

There are many ways to celebrate. You could crack open your old copy of On the Origin of Species, his groundbreaking work describing the theory of evolution. You could book a trip to Down House, where he lived and raised his family. Or, if you’re looking for something impactful, make a contribution to defend evolution education (for a good birthday present you can even do it in his name).

An additional way to celebrate is with music. Darwin-themed songs have been highlighted before, and this is a wonderful option to explore. However, in this post I am proposing a playlist of another sort, in which it is the songs’ arrangement, rather than their content, that honors Darwin.

Today, evolutionary relationships are often represented using a diagram called a phylogenetic tree. (In fact, Darwin sketched one as early as 1837.) In a phylogenetic tree, organisms are placed at the tips of lines called branches. At certain positions in the diagram, adjacent branches intersect. These points of intersection are called nodes. A node represents a common ancestor—a point in the past when a single ancestral population split to give rise to two separate lineages. Clusters of intersecting branches, incorporating all of the species that are descended from a given ancestor, are called clades.

My playlist is organized in exactly the same way. It has 16 songs, each named for a different biological organism. Each song is positioned at the end of a branch; these branches, in turn, are arranged to reflect genealogical relationships.

I selected my songs based on two considerations. First, I wanted a diverse range of organisms, belonging to several different phyla. At the same time, I also wanted to restrict my playlist to famous songs—titles that most people would recognize immediately.

At the top of my list, “Who Let the Dogs Out” is paired with “Hungry Like the Wolf,” reflecting a close evolutionary relationship between dogs and wolves.

Positions 3 and 4 of the playlist are occupied by two more distantly-related carnivores: “The Fox” (better known as “What does the Fox Say?”) and “Eye of the Tiger.”

At positions 5-7 is a second clade of mammals, which diverged from the carnivores approximately 100 million years ago. This clade consists of a lagomorph-themed song: “White Rabbit,” together with a pair of songs named for primates: “Piano Man” and “Shock the Monkey.”

Bird-themed songs form a clade at positions 8-10: “Blackbird,” “When Doves Cry,” and “Peacock.”

Invertebrates occupy positions 11-13. Two arthropods, “Rock Lobster” and “Fireflies,” are paired; a mollusk-themed song, “Octopus’ Garden,” is present on an adjacent branch.

The remaining branches, rounding out the playlist, are devoted to plants and plant products: The Presidents of the United States of America’s “Peaches,” Eric Clapton’s “Cocaine” (cocaine is derived from any of several plants in the genus Erythroxylum), and Maroon 5’s “Sugar.”

The only thing more fun than this playlist is the process of creating one of your own. And you can do that, just like I did, in five easy steps.

Playlist

The full playlist!

1) Select your songs

Your selection criteria—and musical tastes—will likely differ from mine. You might also wish to challenge yourself by honing in on one specific section of the tree of life. Consider, for example, a playlist that is devoted just to flowering plants, or just to protostomes, or just to vertebrates.

Whatever your criteria, though, a variety of search engines can assist you. At Songfacts.com, for example, you can search for “songs with flowers in the title”.  Or for “songs with animals.”

2) Convert your song titles to species names. (Sites like Wikipedia can help.) In this conversion, for example, “Peaches” becomes Prunus persica.

3) Save a list of the species in .txt format

4) Visit TimeTree.org

Scroll to the bottom of the page. At “Load a List of Species,” upload your .txt list. Then, Bam!, Time Tree will generate a phylogenetic tree.

5) Recreate the tree replacing the species names with the song titles

And then, Voilà!: You have a playlist.

As you play around with your playlist, you should also remember: equivalent trees can be written in many different ways. So feel free to headline your playlist with whatever song you’d like: “The Yellow Rose of Texas,” “Hound Dog,” “I Am the Walrus,” whatever. Then tweak the arrangements of the other songs accordingly. And you’ll still have a perfectly accurate tree.

Whatever your plans for February 12th, I hope that you’ll consider making a phylogenetic playlist a part of the celebration. Use mine—you are very welcome to it. Or else build one of your own.

As you listen to your playlist, reflect upon the deep familial connections that link all forms of life. Think, too, about Darwin: the author of the revolutionary conceptual framework that underlies your playlist—the same framework that today enables us to make sense of biology.

And wish him, with all your heart, a happy 209th.

Bio: Rachel Rodman has a Ph.D. in Arabidopsis genetics, and presently aspires to recontextualize all of art, literature, and popular culture in the form of a phylogenetic tree. Won’t you help her?

Free Posters Celebrating Mighty Women in Science

Designer Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya has created a series of incredible posters celebrating women in science. They are perfect for displaying in a classroom, in a kid’s bedroom, or on the wall of your office! Also great for lab spaces and communal break rooms.

The six posters featured here, were created by Amanda, a science-trained designer, to connect the Women’s March to the March for Science as part of her Beyond Curie design project focused on women in science.

Over at A Might Girl, they included an introduction to each of the featured scientists as well as recommended reading for both kids and adults. Find the posters here! Download and enjoy.

Katherine Johnson

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Rosalind Franklin

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Maryam Mirzakhani

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May Britt Moser

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Chien Shiung Wu

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Mae Jemison

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Superheroes might save the world, but they’d totally wreck the environment

 

Miles Traer and two colleagues have calculated the carbon footprint for nine heroes from the comic book canon — and realized that Earth might be better off if they stopped trying to save it.

In a poster presentation, Traer attempted to get people to think about their own carbon footprints by analyzing nine super heros: Oracle, the Flash, Batman, Iron Man, Jessica Jones, Firebird, Spider-Man, Superman and Swamp Thing. Spider-Man needs to manufacture his carbon nanotube webbing. Firebird depends on combustion to conjure tornadoes of flame. The Flash must eat a ton of meat to maintain his super fast speeds.

“If I calculate my own carbon footprint, that’s a bummer,” Traer says. “But if I calculate it for Batman, things get interesting.”

To further make his point, Traer considers how his heroes might lessen their impact on the environment. By going vegetarian, the Flash could reduce his emissions from 90 million pounds of carbon dioxide to just 3 million. If Bruce Wayne stopped spending money on Batman gear, he could pay for carbon offsets for the entire population of downtown Chicago.

The implied message: If a masked vigilante with too much money and a shortage of good judgment can redeem himself, you can, too.

Want to know more? Read about it here!

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How Do You Keep an Elephant Warm? Knit a Giant Blanket

Today, in articles that make you go “d-awwwwwww”

Unseasonably cold  weather hit the Winga Baw camp for orphaned elephants in Myanmar, and workers scrambled to protect the seven animals in their care, using straw to keep them warm, according to Sangdeaun Lek Chailert, founder of the Save Elephant Foundation, a nonprofit based in Thailand that is dedicated to Asian elephants.

Temperatures fell to 8 degrees Celsius (46 degrees Fahrenheit) in some parts of the country. But the camp, in the Bago Region of Myanmar, had another secret weapon: giant knitted and crocheted blankets.

They were donated by Blankets for Baby Rhinos, a wildlife conservation craft group founded in November 2016 on Facebook by Sue Brown, who has been involved in rhino conservation for 25 years, and Elisa Best, a veterinary surgeon.

Want to know more? Read about it here!

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Mail-Order CRISPR Kits Allow Absolutely Anyone to Hack DNA

CRISPR has become so pervasive, that while I was at a party this weekend in Berlin I had three different people ask me if I’m working on CRISPR (for the record, I’m not).

But now you can! Seriously, DIY CRISPR kits are now available for purchase online. Read about one journalist’s journey trying to figure out if she was successful in her gene editing endeavors.

But equally hilarious are the posts I’ve seen on facebook of scientist considering buying the kit for the cheap lab equipment (optional mini-centrifuge for 125… that normally costs a few thousand dollars…).

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