Want to see us in your Facebook News Feed? You should probably do this one weird thing.

Click this, please.

Click this, please.

A whole lot of folks—433!—have “liked” the Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! page on Facebook, which ought to mean that all those people see new posts from the site right in their Facebook News Feed. But we’ve found that our Facebook posts are typically seen by a lot fewer than 433 folks—and the number seems to be declining. This may be a symptom of something happening with Facebook pages in general—fewer posts are reaching the people who’ve “liked” pages, possibly because there are just more pages to “like.” The solution offered by FB is to pay for placement in people’s news feeds, but this “promotion” can reach a lot of people who really aren’t interested, and that’s not why we have a Facebook page in the first place.

If you want to ensure that posts from Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! make it into your News Feed, there is one thing you can do: Turn on the “get notifications” option on our page. This is illustrated above—it’s in a drop-down menu attached to the “Like” button itself. Selecting “get notifications” tells Facebook’s News Feed algorithm to give our posts priority in your feed.

And, if you want a less convoluted option, you can also receive Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! posts on Twitter or via RSS subscription using the links in our sidebar.

(Hat tip to the Facebook page for Small Pond Science for pointing me toward that recent article about the declining audience for FB pages. Ironic sourcing? Yes, maybe.)

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Merch that makes sense!

Have you ever thought that the images on the Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! header would look great on tee-shirts? Well, we did—and now you, too can own a stylish American Apparel tee shirt, or a sturdy coffee mug, printed with our icons and the slogan we’ve shamelessly appropriated from Theodosius Dobzhansky.

You can choose from black or red shirts with the dinosaur, bacterium, glassware, and DNA helix icons on the front, and all with the slogan on the back; or mugs with either the bacterium or the slogan text. Head on over to custom-printing site Spreadshirt and order a shirt or three. Proceeds will go towards the (small, but nonzero) costs of maintaining this site, so thanks in advance for ordering!

Help us make sense!

Image via.

Are you a working biologist, biology student, or other person with a first-hand connection to the living world? Do you like reading science blogs—including maybe this one—and wonder what it’d be like to get into this online-popular-science-writing thing? Or do you have your own science blog already, and want to expand your audience?

Then you should write a guest post for Nothing in Biology Makes Sense!

We prioritize contributions from folks who work in biology in a broad sense—anything from medicine to academia to industry, at career stages from undergraduate students to professors. And, true to our headline, we’re especially interested in pieces that show how something in biology makes sense if you think about it in light of evolution.

Wondering what a good guest post looks like? Check out previous ones by David Hembry, Kathryn Turner, Levi Morran, and Amy Dapper—who is now joining us as a regular contributor.

So what are you waiting for? E-mail Jeremy to propose a post and discuss scheduling—we’re especially looking for posts in the upcoming fall semester.

Help us make sense!

Image via.

Are you a working biologist, biology student, or other person with a first-hand connection to the living world? Do you like reading science blogs—including maybe this one—and wonder what it’d be like to get into this online-popular-science-writing thing? Or do you have your own science blog already, and want to expand your audience? Then you should consider writing a guest post for Nothing in Biology Makes Sense!

We’ll prioritize contributions from folks who work in biology in a broad sense—anything from medicine to basic research, at career stages from students to professors. And, true to our headline, we’ll be especially interested in pieces that show how something in biology makes sense, if you think about it in light of evolution.

Wondering what a good guest post looks like? Check out previous ones by Tom Houslay, Colin Beale, and James Winters.

So what are you waiting for? E-mail Jeremy to propose a post and discuss scheduling.

Help us make sense!

Image via.

Are you a working biologist, biology student, or other person with a first-hand connection to the living world? Do you like reading science blogs, including this one, and wonder what it’d be like to get into this online-popular-science-writing thing? Or do you have your own science blog already, and you’d like to expand your audience? Then you should consider writing a guest post for Nothing in Biology Makes Sense!

E-mail Jeremy to propose a post and discuss scheduling. We’ll prioritize contributions from folks who work in biology in a broad sense—anything from medicine to basic research, at career stages from students to professors. And, true to our headline, we’ll be especially interested in pieces that show how something in biology makes sense, if you think about it in light of evolution.

‘Tis the season

wreath

For taking a break, that is. Those of us on the academic calendar (which is all of us, actually) are wrapping up a fall semester, and this seems like a good time to take it easy for awhile. There may be some intermittent, maybe even relevant, activity over the Saturnalia hiatus, but we’re not committing to anything while there’s eggnog to be had and carolers to be heckled. Look for regular science posts to resume in the new year!