Dinosaur Babies are a Bit on the Slow Side

Since birds are dinosaurs, we have long assumed the quick way that birds exit their shell was mimicked in their much larger and significantly more extinct brethren.

However, it turns out that it takes much longer (3-6 months) for a dinosaur to exit its shell.

Why does that matter? Well it might have put them at a disadvantage relative to faster producing animals, like mammals and modern birds.

Curious how scientist figured it out (No, they didn’t clone dinosaurs like Jurassic Park… yet)? Check it out over at Science.

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The Best “Art Meets Science” Books of 2016

I love the “best books of the year” lists. I live for their insight, and to update my reading list (or cull theirs).

But Smithsonian has really outdone itself. Looking for a new coffee table book (who isn’t) or simply want to indulge in how spectacularly beautiful the natural world is? Then check out the Smithsonian list of the Best “Art Meets Science” Books of 2016. 

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Ocean Bees

Yes, you read that correctly. There are bees. In the ocean.

Well, sort of. Similar to land plants, sea grasses need pollinating. But it’s long been assumed that pollination is facilitated by the current, and the pollen just floats from one plant to the next.

But it turns out that some crustaceans are actually pollinating the grass. Making them the bees of the ocean.

Read about it here!

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The Spike-Toothed Salmon

“Back in 1972 paleontologists T. Cavender and R.R. Miller named a huge fossil fish from the Pliocene deposits of Oregon. They called it Smilodonichthys rastrosus – the “knife fish.” The fish’s impressive teeth were thought to stick straight down, like those of a sabertooth cat, and so it became known as the sabertooth salmon.”

Curious? You should be! Read all about this fearsome salmon and it’s history over at Scientific American!

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How one turtle’s tale helps promote ocean conservation

Sea turtles are in trouble. They are notorious for swallowing things they shouldn’t and given the amount of plastic that ends up in the ocean this is unlikely to stop anytime soon.

But the baby sea turtle at aquariums, like the one at Monterey Bay, are helping people see the importance of protecting these curious little eaters.

Read about it over at Scientific American!

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