Giant Irish Elk Antlers

The antlers of an ancient Irish Elk have been found by a fisherman in Lough Neagh, Co. Tyrone.

The creature was the largest deer that ever lived and has been extinct for thousands of years.

The catch has a span of more than 3 m and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old.

This is just a cool look at a cool extinct animal. So cool.

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A devestating fire

Any regular reader of this blog will know I love collections.

Which is one of the many MANY reasons I’m devastated about the fire at the National Museum of Brazilian.

In summary: the fire burned for six hours and left behind ashes where there had been dinosaur fossils (including the reconstructed Maxakalisaurus topai), the oldest human remains in the Americas, Luiza, and the audio recording and documents of indigenous languages that are otherwise extinct.

We will never be able to replace these items and the knowledge they contain is irreplaceable. Our collective knowledge is worse off as a result.

And with the devastated feeling of the incalculable loss, we’re starting to take stock of how this could have been prevented.

Funding for one (read about how the museum was underfunded for decades). And another is digitalizing the collection.

But for now, I will remain in morning for the knowledge that has gone up in flames.

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Thomas Jefferson Built This Country On Mastodons

Jefferson liked science more than he liked politics. He was a fastidious vegetable breeder and weather recorder, he led the American Philosophical Society for eighteen years, and he once spent a while re-engineering the plow according to Newtonian principals. He particularly loved fossils, and collected and speculated on them so avidly that he is considered “the founder of North American paleontology,” says Dr. Mark Barrow, an environmental history professor at Virginia Tech.

And he spent his life in a quiet war about the importance of american mastadons.

Read more about it here!

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Dracula: the largest flying dinosaur yet!

Good news! Jurassic World II comes out this summer. Which means that I’m going to be posting a lot about dinosaurs, because my nerdy evolution heart starts beating faster when we talk about the prehistoric.

For those who remember, pterosaurs were the first flying vertebrates, and ruled the skies. And in Romania’s Transylvania region scientists discovered the bones of a new pterosaur. They nicknamed their find “Dracula.” Using the fragments of bone as their guide, scientists reconstructed a model of the creature—which they say is the largest pterosaur found to date, reaching around 3.5 meters high with an estimated 12-meter wingspan.

The reconstruction is now on display as part of a new pterosaur exhibit at the Altmühltal Dinosaur Museum in Denkendorf, Germany. The exhibit also separately showcases the original specimen’s excavated bones.

Which I will be visiting this summer, because BOY THAT SOUNDS AWESOME!

Read more about it here.

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Why birds matter, and are worth protecting

I’m always amazed by scientists who LOVE their organisms. And bird people really take this to a whole new level.

In 1918 Congress passed the Migratory Bird Treaty Act to protect birds from wanton killing. To celebrate the centennial, National Geographic is partnering with the National Audubon SocietyBirdLife International, and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to declare 2018 the Year of the Bird.

To start the year off right, read this impassioned story by Jonathan Franzen about how much he loves birds and why.

And celebrate, the year of the bird!

 

 

Shelf Life: 33 Million Things

@GrrlScientist wrote an excellent article over at Medium (written for the Guardian).

“Natural history museums are many things but they are not the exclusive domain of dry, dusty old white men, rooting around in dry, dusty old drawers, examining dry, dusty old dead things. In fact, most natural history museums are modern research institutions filled with a vast diversity of items and people whose lives revolve around them. They are collections of almost anything you can name or imagine, from centuries-old specimens to more recently collected frozen tissues and digitised genomic data. These collections are essential catalogues to the sciences of taxonomy, phylogeny and biogeography, disciplines that provide a firm footing for evolution, natural history, ecology, behaviour, conservation and anthropology as well as insights into more recent processes like human-created climate change.”

Want more? Read about it here!

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