Carnival of Evolution, July 2012

The Mousetrap

A new Carnival of Evolution is online at the Mousetrap. This edition of the monthly collection of online writing about evolution sorts a long list of blog posts into mousetrap-related themes, and it includes more than enough to fill up your e-reader for, say, the long flight out to some sort of academic conference in the capital of Canada.

Carnival of Evolution, June 2012

The monthly roundup of evolution-related online writing is (finally) live at Pharyngula, now that host P.Z. Myers is back from a trip to Iceland. P.Z. indulges his hominid cognitive biases by sorting the contributed links into neat, if somewhat idiosyncratic, categories: Bacteria, Plants, Charismatic Megafauna, Humans, Charismatic Organs in Charismatic Megafauna (i.e., mostly brains and penises), Theory, History, and Idiots. Take a moment to speculate as to where our own contributions were classified, and then head over to the Carnival for posts from Jerry Coyne, Anne GutmannArvind Pillai, and many more.

Carnival of Evolution, May 2012

This month’s issue of the Carnival of Evolution, which collects online writing about Darwin’s dangerous idea and all its variously modified descendents, is online over at John S. Wilkins’s blog Evolving Thoughts. Highlights include, but are not limited to, an attempt to trace the origin of the phrase “social Darwinism,” discussion of how sloths and turtles evolved to move slowly, and whether the diet of early humans was more healthy than ours. And there’s even a few contributions from this very blog. Go now and read the whole thing.

Carnival roundup: Berry-go-Round and Diversity in Science

 

On the last day of April, two blog carnivals—collections of links to posts on a given topic—are freshy posted, and both are worth some of your surfing time.

First, over at Seeds Aside, is a double March/April edition of Berry-go-Round, which rounds up online writing about all things botanical, with everything from peppers to savannah treetops to electrical signalling within the tissues of carnivorous plants.

And then over at her blog on Scientopia, Scicurious is hosting an edition of the Diversity in Science Carnival devoted to “imposter syndrome,” the nagging fear of secret inferiority that almost everyone seems to feel at some point in a scientific career. Imposter syndrome can be especially troublesome for women and members of minority groups, who may not see many folks that look like them amongst their colleagues.