Explore above and below the melting Antarctic

Amongst all the news this week, you may have missed something catastrophic. There are some disturbing developments from Antarctica, where scientists are seeing evidence that the ice sheets may have started irreversible disintegration.

And really interestingly, the New York Times has done a series of virtual reality films that explore what’s happening above and below the ice.

Check it out here!

KeefeM20020327.jpg

How to have a scientific debate

Science denialists often claim that “the scientists haven’t decided” “it’s still being debated”. With respect to climate change, evolution and GMOs, that’s largely not true.

But the world of anthropology is heating up these days with some hot topics like when were humans in North America, and what did our ancestors look like/do?

Want to know more about what’s lighting the anthropological scene up? Read about it here.

ap_264458692501-6b754b065f3da9340aaa9c961863897d3cdad617-s1300-c85.jpg

Four vaccine myths and where they came from

One of the many problems with science denial is figuring out where the rumors started.

In terms of the war on vaccination, Science has nicely provided a list of claims and where they originated. Read it here.

autism_vaccines_makinaro.png.CROP.original-original.png

Also as a bonus, see this pediatrician’s response to parents that don’t want to vaccinate their children. His post has recently gone viral (even though it’s been around for awhile), and is worth reading. He especially emphasizes that he is willing to answer every question that parents have about vaccines, but he’s just not willing to make exceptions.

The deficit model of STEM recruitment

Over at Small Pond Science, there is a thought provoking post about how to truly ‘diversify STEM fields.

If you want to truly diversify, then we need to stop trying to fill in the holes based on perceived deficiencies. Instead, we need to focus on training complete scientists. We need to fundamentally change our mindset about what a successful student looks like in a way that doesn’t reflect systemic inequities — and then enact a training and recruitment agenda based on that mindset. We can continue investing our time and resources trying to get URM students to look more competitive against white students from private universities.”

Interested? Read more here. 

z-image.jpeg

The conservative power of grass

“Almost 50 years ago, fried chicken tycoon David Bamberger used his fortune to purchase 5,500 acres of overgrazed land in the Texas Hill Country. Planting grasses to soak in rains and fill hillside aquifers, Bamberger devoted the rest of his life to restoring the degraded landscape. Today, the land has been restored to its original habitat and boasts enormous biodiversity. Bamberger’s model of land stewardship is now being replicated across the region and he is considered to be a visionary in land management and water conservation.”

Understanding how cancer evolves is the key to stopping it

We started this blog as a means to talk to non-scientists about biology, and since we’re a group of evolutionary biologist, to talk mostly about evolutionary biology. My first post (oh those long years ago) was about Evolutionary Medicine. So imagine my delight with this recent article in the Atlantic addresses about how understanding evolution helps treat cancer. I don’t think I need to say this is awesome, but just in case… this is awesome.

Read about it here!

1920.jpg