An accidental discovery of a new technology to fight cancer

Sometimes scientific breakthroughs come to us in the strangest of ways. At Sloan Kettering Cancer Center researchers teamed up with physicians studying lung cancer to test the use of nanoparticles in treating lung cancer.

They followed the nanoparticles injected into mice, and one of their nanoparticles didn’t behave as expected at all.

“To our surprise, this particle accumulated almost exclusively in a specific structure of the kidney and stayed there until all of it had degraded” – Ryan Williams, Postdoctoral Fellow at Sloan Kettering and the studies first author.

But, this misbehaving particle has a promising future. For the most common form of kidney cancer, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), this nanoparticle could deliver treatment directly to the tumor, while not disturbing other organs. It could also enable new ways to treat chemotherapy-induced kidney failure.

Quite a little whoops, that may turn into a major success!

Learn about it over at the Sloan Kettering website. 

Mesoscale nanoparticles visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The diameter of an average particle measures about 400 nanometers, which is about 50 times smaller than the width of a human hair. (from Sloan Kettering Article)

Mesoscale nanoparticles visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The diameter of an average particle measures about 400 nanometers, which is about 50 times smaller than the width of a human hair. (from Sloan Kettering Article)

 

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