The cost of attracting pollinators is … attracting everyone else

Flowers of Dalechampia scan dens, with key measurements indicated. Figure 1 of Perez-Barrales et al. (2013).

Flowers of Dalechampia scandens, with key measurements indicated. Figure 1 of Perez-Barrales et al. (2013).

Flowers that rely on animal pollinators to remix their genetic material have evolved a tremendous diversity of strategies for attracting those pollinators—from beguiling scents to elaborate visual displays to pretending to be a lady pollinator.

But there’s a downside to making a big, showy display to attract pollinators—you might also attract visitors who have less helpful intentions than gathering up some pollen and moving on to the next flower. Showy flowers might attract animals that steal the rewards offered to pollinators—or they might attract animals that eat the flowers themselves, or the developing seeds created by pollination. So the evolution of attractive floral displays might very well be a compromise between attracting the right visitors, and attracting the wrong ones.

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