Natural History in the -omics era

This post is a guest contribution by Michael Harvey, graduate student in Robb Brumfield‘s lab at the Museum of Natural Science at Louisiana State University. Mike studies avian evolution, phylogenomics, and Neotropical ornithology. 

Blackwater river…approximate Bayesian computation…dawn song…genomic islands…wing chord…target DNA enrichment…

My life as an evolutionary biologist straddles two worlds. I study the comparative phylogeography of Amazonian birds, and on the one hand my research involves laboratory and computational methods that push the limits of new technologies and analytical techniques, and on the other, expeditions to the tropics that are nearly indistinguishable from the natural history work conducted by Victorian era biologists. I am a PhD student at Louisiana State University, and for most of the year my work is in the lab and at my desk. For several months of the year, however, my work is general ornithological collecting expeditions to the Amazon Basin.

Continue reading