What’s changed in evolution and ecology since I started my Ph.D.

The rise of big data is changing ecology and evolutionary biology, along with the rest of the life sciences.

This week’s post is a guest contribution by David Hembry, who recently finished his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley, working on coevolution and diversification of the obligate pollination mutualism between leafflower plants (Phyllantheae) and leafflower moths (Epicephala). He will be starting a postdoctoral fellowship at Kyoto University in the fall.

Last month, I filed my PhD dissertation, bringing to an end an intellectual and personal journey that began seven years ago in the summer of 2005. I know a lot more now than I did then, and I know a lot more about the boundaries of what I don’t know, too. But not only has my knowledge changed—evolution and ecology looks a lot different now than it did seven years ago when I was planning my dissertation research. At some point, and often multiple points, in the process of getting a PhD, everybody wonders whether what they’re doing is already out of date. Some of the transformations in the field I think I could see coming. For instance, it was clear in 2005 that computational power would keep increasing, phylogenetics would be used more and more to ask interesting questions, more and more genomes would be available for analysis, and evolutionary developmental biology was on the rise. It was unfortunately also predictable that it would be possible to study climate change in real time over PhD-length timescales. And although the 2008 global financial crisis didn’t help, it was clear that funding and jobs were going to be more competitive than they had been for our predecessors.

But there were a number of things I didn’t see coming, and which have made the field look radically different than it was back in 2005. Looking back, and looking towards the future, here are the changes I think were most important (from an evolutionist’s perspective), and what I think they mean for young scientists.

Continue reading

Advertisements