Friday coffee break

Coffee flasks

Siphoned coffee.

Every Friday at Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! our contributors pass around links to new scientific results, or science-y news, or videos of adorable wildlife, that they’re most likely to bring up while waiting in line for a latte.

From Devin: A new service, Peerage of Science, which conducts peer review of scientific articles independently of any single journal, is evaluated in the pages of Trends in Ecology and Evolution; see also the response by Peerage of Science.

First, PoS aims to enhance the quality of reviewing by encouraging non-anonymous review, introducing ‘peer review of peer review’, providing the possibility for reviewers to publish their review as a ‘Peerage Essay’ (PE) and to build a ‘referee factor’. Previous attempts at non-anonymous review have discovered, however, that most reviewers prefer anonymity. Peer review of peer review and the implementation of a referee factor are certainly good ideas, but reviewers who want to remain anonymous would waste their time writing a PE. Additionally, it will not always be possible to have an original insight and bring new perspectives to every evaluated paper, and the PE could become outdated after manuscript revision. A solution could be to let the comments to authors be assessed by the other reviewers and make the writing of a PE optional. [In-text citations removed.]

(Jeremy also notes that PoS is either an unfortunate, or a brilliant, abbreviation for a peer review system.)

From Sarah: For the week of Valentine’s Day, Paleontology writer Bryan Switek considers what we know about the mating habits of dinosaurs.

Rather than simply leaning straight against the top of a female like an elephant or rhinoceros does, a male sauropod would probably have to rear up at a relatively oblique angle, and the female would have to assist by moving her tail (which is also a way in which female dinosaurs could have exerted mate choice and confounded any hot-under-the-collar males they would rather not mate with).

From Jon: New research finds that interval training—exercise in a series of brief bursts—can improve fitness faster than more time spent in sustained exertion.

Several years ago, the McMasters scientists did test a punishing workout, known as high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, that involved 30 seconds of all-out effort at 100 percent of a person’s maximum heart rate. After six weeks, these lacerating HIIT sessions produced similar physiological changes in the leg muscles of young men as multiple, hour-long sessions per week of steady cycling, even though the HIIT workouts involved about 90 percent less exercise time. [Links sic.]

From Jeremy: Documents leaked from a conservative think-tank with ties to companies like GM and Microsoft reveal plans to excise climate change from basic science education.

One thing I want to point out right away which is very illuminating, if highly disturbing, about what Heartland allegedly wants to do: they are considering developing a curriculum for teachers to use in the classroom to sow confusion about climate change. I know, it sounds like I’m making that up, but I’m not. In this document they say:

[Dr. Wojick‘s] effort will focus on providing curriculum that shows that the topic of climate change is controversial and uncertain – two key points that are effective at dissuading teachers from teaching science.

[Links and formatting sic.]

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