Friday Coffee Break: Sounding the alarm on global warming, gut microbes and radiation therapy, and life, uh, finding a way.

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Here’s what we’ll be chatting about while we’re waiting in line for a latte.

“For anybody who was already paying attention, the report contains no new science. But the language in the 18-page report, called ‘What We Know,’ is sharper, clearer and more accessible than perhaps anything the scientific community has put out to date.” (via Jeremy)

“Over the last century, almost every frontline antimalarial drug – chloroquine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine – has become obsolete because of defiant parasites that emerged from western Cambodia.” (Jeremy)

Here are some adorable, possibly NSFW, definitely anthropomorphic illustrations of the diversity of animal mating systems. (Sarah)

“The aim is to build up a profile of gut bacteria which will allow us to predict who will suffer side-effects that might limit the effectiveness of the radiotherapy.” (Sarah)

“After years of predicting it would happen — and after years of having their suggestions largely ignored by companies, farmers and regulators — scientists have documented the rapid evolution of corn rootworms that are resistant to [genetically modified] Bt corn.” (Sarah, who also notes that this is yet further confirmation of Malcolm’s Law.)

Friday Coffee Break: Terror birds, privatized science, and negotiating (or not) for a faculty job

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Here’s what we’ll be talking about while we wait in line for a latte.

“The 18 known species, the tallest growing to a staggering 10 feet tall, didn’t bother with flying, instead opting to chase down all those creatures that had only just thrown their good-riddance-to-the-massive-carnivorous-dinosaurs party. The poor things woke up with a hangover, and the hangover was the terror bird.” (from Jeremy)

“In a long, narrow strip of territory from Kansas to New Jersey, two closely related species of chickadees meet, mate and give birth to hybrid birds. Now scientists are reporting that this so-called hybrid zone is moving north at a rate that matches the warming trend in winter temperatures.” (Jeremy)

“Created by divers for divers, this global, underwater survey of rubbish is designed to increase debris removal efforts, prevent harm to marine life and connect your underwater actions to policy changes and prevention.” (CJ)

“For better or worse,” said Steven A. Edwards, a policy analyst at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, “the practice of science in the 21st century is becoming shaped less by national priorities or by peer-review groups and more by the particular preferences of individuals with huge amounts of money.” (Noah)

“Despite such power players in W’s corner, however, the fact remains that in a substantial portion of the academic discussion, she is being eviscerated, all for having the audacity to stick up for herself for the first (and possibly last) time in her career.” (Sarah)

“I don’t know what happened on the job interview, but that email from the candidate to the Dean is a huge red flag word embroidered with script that reads: ‘I don’t want to teach’ and ‘I expect you to give me resources just like a research university would.’” (Sarah)

Friday Coffee Break: The river of Twitter, the history of an actual river, and evolution in a storybook

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Here’s what we’ll be discussing while we wait in line for a latte.

“A healthy first reaction to every and any tweet is ‘Golly, I wonder what the hell the context for that could possibly be!’” (Via Sarah)

“Children learned a lot from one pretty basic storybook intervention so imagine what a curriculum spread over several years might do for scientific literacy long term.” (Sarah)

Time-lapse satellite images track the shifting oxbow curves of Peru’s Ucayali River over 28 years. (Noah)

“It is alarming that so many Nobel Prize recipients have lamented that they would never have survived this current academic environment.” (Noah)

“The data lying behind this graphic reflects some of the biggest changes in the history of English. Today, English borrows from other languages with a truly global sweep.” (Jeremy)

“Ingenuity and lots of sticky tape and glue have helped a rare parrot chick survive against the odds.” (Jeremy)

Friday Coffee Break: Defrosting an ice age virus, the joy of trilobites, and the collective weight of land mammals

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“The last time it infected anything was more than 30,000 years ago, but in the laboratory it has sprung to life once again.” (From Sarah)

“Among the people I do know who have done PhDs, I have seen depression, sleep issues, eating disorders, alcoholism, self-harming, and suicide attempts.” (Sarah)

” ‘A lot of people, when they see these fossils, don’t believe they’re real,’ said Dr. Huber, who is 54, fit from years of fieldwork, and proud that the state fossil of his native Ohio is a trilobite. ‘They think they must be artists’ models.’ ” (Noah)

“Earth’s Land Mammals by Weight.” And, the 2014 Mammals Suck March Madness Bracket! (Amy)

“What’s creepier than a worm rearing up on its tail to snag a passing insect? A thousand worms uniting into a single living, writhing, waving tower to snag a passing insect.” (Jeremy)

“Nye is widely viewed as having won that debate, but Ham may have gotten the last word: on Thursday he announced that his Creation Museum’s proposed Noah’s Ark theme park, including a 510-foot replica of the Biblical vessel, had against all odds secured a last-minute $62 million municipal bond offering.” (Jeremy)

Friday Coffee Break

Every Friday at Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! our contributors pass around links to new scientific results, or science-y news, or videos of adorable wildlife, that they’re most likely to bring up while waiting in line for a latte.

It’s like the saddest picture book you’ve ever read. True stories about how some species went extinct. (from Jeremy)

The hoatzin becomes an even cooler bird. (from Noah)

Looking for a phylogenetics discussion board? Try phylobabble. Looking for free silhouette pictures of plants and animals? Try phylopic. (from Sarah)

When art and science meet – oh baby – that’s some good stuff. Awesome glass sculptures of viruses. (from CJ)

Are you an aspiring statistician? How to read histograms and use them in R.  (from Amy)

They look like ants, but they’re ain’ts! (from Jeremy)

Need help with the whole peer-review thing? Look no further than this guide from the British Ecological Society. (from Sarah)

Friday Coffee Break

Every Friday at Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! our contributors pass around links to new scientific results, or science-y news, or videos of adorable wildlife, that they’re most likely to bring up while waiting in line for a latte.

Should we consider poop a drug or a tissue when it’s used to cure the ill? Or – now hear me out – a DIY project?

“Fairness” may have evolved out of spite, not goodness. (That sounds about right, wouldn’t you say, humans?)

Your brain and Fido’s are more similar than you might think.

Ever notice how the “impossible” actually happens sometimes? Why is that?

Friday Coffee Break

Every Friday at Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! our contributors pass around links to new scientific results, or science-y news, or videos of adorable wildlife, that they’re most likely to bring up while waiting in line for a latte.

Ant larvae only poop ONCE?!?! (From Jeremy)

Sir David Attenborough is losing patience with you people. (From Sarah)

Long-read (and Yong-read) on the endosymbiotic origin of eukaryotes. (From Jeremy)

5 misconceptions about evolution, with very nice graphics. (From CJ)

A nice synopsis on the joy of scientific discovery. (From Bill Nye, from Amy)

Why do stinky animals live alone? Hint: It’s not the reason stinky humans live alone. (From Jeremy)

Some harsh advice on your cover letter. (From Sarah)

Friday Coffee Break

Every Friday at Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! our contributors pass around links to new scientific results, or science-y news, or videos of adorable wildlife, that they’re most likely to bring up while waiting in line for a latte Turkish coffee.

Will the puma catch the monkey? Let the pictures tell the story. (From Noah)

What’s the connection between cycling success, birth control and attractiveness? Science. (From Amy)

Can’t get enough of the Bill Nye/Ken Ham debate? We’ve got “the most powerful evidence for evolution that you can imagine” (from Jeremy). Also, and dependent on your blood pressure, the somewhat baffling list of 22 messages from Creationists after the debate.

Boobies are amazing. (I know you want to click this one because you have no idea what’s going to come up. Am I right? From Sarah)

Bee sting, bad. Bee portrait, oh so good. (From Noah)

Better than citations, enter the hypercitation. (From Sarah)

Friday Coffee Break

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Here’s what we’ll be talking about while we wait in line for a latte:

The latest news in the human-neanderthal hybridization story: some neanderthal genes may have contributed to human adaptation during the expansion out of Africa. From Amy.

Anemones have been discovered living attached to antarctic sea ice. From Amy.

Rattlesnakes in the southwest have astoundingly variable venom. The variation confounds attempts at developing antivenoms and its adaptive significance is unknown. From Jeremy.

Did we learn nothing from Jurassic Park? The strain of Yersinia pestis that caused one of the worst plagues in human history has been extracted from a preserved tooth of one of its victims and had it’s genome sequenced. From Sarah.

A link containing a video of a flying snake. What more could you ask for? From Noah.

Think your tilapia-tomato aquaponic system is clever? Well the three-toed sloth has got you beat. It’s running an algae-moth system in its fur. From Noah.

Friday Coffee Break

Here’s what we’ll be talking about while we wait in line for a latte (and ^^^ is what we’ll be doing when we read the links):

A new amazonian river dolphin species discovered! From Noah.

Not biology, but… Yale student fight with their administration over use and display of course evaluation data. From Noah.

Everyone loves a nice juicy taxonomy fail. Don’t know what a salp is? Neither do a whole bunch of people writing stories about them on the internet. From CJ.

Mantis shrimp, best known for rapidly producing enormous amounts of force with their claws also have a unique and somewhat mysterious visual system. From CJ.

8 ways animals survive the winter. From Sarah.

Antibiotic resistance defined. From Sarah.

An absurd PLOS ONE paper presents the “quilt plot” which is really just a simple heatmap… but it spurs Lior Pachter to ask just what measures should go into a heatmap comparing gene expression data sets. From Noah.

Amateur ornithologists banding hummingbird (particularly in Louisiana!) have helped show that many species successfully winter year after year on the gulf coast. From Noah