Carnival of Evolution, April 2013

Tomorrowland at Dusk

What kind of sequencing capacity do they have in Tomorrowland? Photo by Big DumpTruck.

The April 2013 edition of the Carnival of Evolution is online over at Synthetic Daisies. This issue of the monthly collection of online writing about all things evolution-y is organized around the theme of the future of evolution—which looks to be full of exciting possibilities. There’s experimental phylogenetics and speculation about radio-sensing animals and species coming back from the dead, so maybe you should go peruse the whole thing.

Carnival of Evolution, March 2013

Carnival of Venice 2010

Welcome, readers, to the 57th Carnival of Evolution. This past month, the 204th birthday of Charles Darwin just happened to fall on Mardi Gras, a celebration of life’s exuberant excesses. So put on your most dazzling mask, and join us for an exploration of the endless forms most beautiful to be found in the living, evolving world.

Evolutionary science

In addition to Darwin Day and Mardi Gras, February is the month of Valentine’s Day. So it’s maybe appropriate that evolutionary bloggers had sex on the brain. Joachim describes new research on the specific forms of natural selection that might have supported the evolution of sexual reproduction. Right here at Nothing in Biology Makes Sense!, Amy Dapper writes about one consequence of sex, among grass gobies: “sneaker” males with specialized sperm. And Jeremy Yoder (yours truly) takes a look at daisies that attract pollinators by fooling them into mating with deceptive flower petals.

Meanwhile, Hannah Waters explains why sociable weaver birds nest together—because it pays to stay home and help their parents.

While most songbird species breed before they even turn a year old, sociable weavers rarely breed before the age of two. Instead, these younger birds help raise other nestlings–their siblings as well as unrelated chicks–by gathering food and maintaining the nest’s fluffy interior chambers and external sticks and grass.

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The Molecular Ecology Online Forum

Cross-posted from Denim and Tweed.

Remember the Molecular Ecologist symposium I attended as part of the 2012 Evolution meetings in Ottawa? Well, there’s going to be a sequel, launching Wednesday in convenient online format.

The Molecular Ecologist will be hosting speakers from the Ottawa symposium in a live-chat on the blog, starting at 9 a.m. US Central Time and running until noon (that’s 3-6 p.m. GMT, for those of us located outside North American). We’re trying out a live-chat service called CoverItLive, which will let readers follow the coversation and submit questions and/or comments directly from the blog — test runs have gone pretty smoothly, and I’m excited to see how this works as a medium for scientific discussion.

If you want to review the Ottawa symposium beforehand, check out the archived material at the Molecular Ecology websited. To indicate your interest and submit questions in advance, e-mail Molecular Ecology Managing Editor Tim Vines; otherwise, just join us Wednesday morning at The Molecular Ecologist.◼