Don’t Buy This

One of the co-founders of the structure of the DNA, James Watson, is selling his Nobel Prize medallion.

And since he’s bringing himself back into the media spotlight, an article at slate reminds us all of some of his verbal gems.:

“Whenever you interview fat people you feel bad, because you know you’re not going to hire them.”

When speaking about women in science, “I think having all these women around makes it more fun for the men but they’re probably less effective.”

What else did the resident bad grandpa of science say recently? Read more here. 

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Charismatic Minifauna

A recent publication (B. Misof, et al. 2014. Phylogenomics resolves the timing and pattern of insect evolution. Science 346 (6210): 763-767.) takes on the herculean task of finding when insects first evolved. This is a particularly vexing question because 1) insects are squishy and don’t fossilize well, and 2) the vast majority of the species on the planet are insects. This is an insect world, we just live in it.

The paper was summarized BRILLIANTLY on WIRED (here). Including my favorite quote:

“Making sense of the diversity of insects in collections has traditionally been a task for a lone expert, usually specializing in just one subset of a group. They become so identified with their study organisms, they may be introduced as “The Ant Man” or “The Wasp Woman.” (No taxonomists I know wear spandex tights and capes to work, for which I am profoundly grateful.)”

Find out about when insects evolved, when they diversified (surprisingly, it started PRIOR to the radiation of angiosperms) and more.

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A Conversation about High Throughput Sequencing and General Biology

In a recent keynote address at the High Throughput Sequencing for Neuroscience meetings, Sean Eddy from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute addresses the need for biologist to do their own sequence analysis. Although this talk was given by a neuroscience rather than an evolutionary biologist, the conversation is generally applicable to the entire biological community.

Favorite quotes:

“But if you’re a biologist pursuing a hypothesis-driven biological problem, and you’re using using a sequencing-based assay to ask part of your question, generically expecting a bioinformatician in your sequencing core to analyze your data is like handing all your gels over to some guy in the basement who uses a ruler and a lightbox really well.”

“If you learned to implement it in Perl — and you could do this in an afternoon, with a few lines of Perl code — I think you would find yourself endowed with a superpower, like Wonder Woman with her golden lasso of truth, and it’s a superpower that a biologist can use with surprising effectiveness on large data sets.”

Find the whole article here.

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Ebola: Why you should and shouldn’t be concerned

Over at Wired, this article does an excellent job summarizing why you should be concerned with Ebola in Africa, and maybe not worry about it as much in the US.

Especially worth reading this quote here:

“Ebola isn’t anywhere near as contagious as the flu, for example. Or measles, which is much more of a threat in the United States now that people are no longer routinely vaccinating their children. Scientists estimate that one person infected with measles can transmit the disease to as many as 18 others; for Ebola, that number is around two.”

It also does an excellent job of highlighting the concerns with the virus, and why you should and shouldn’t be worried.

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